Information About Chantilly VA

Chantilly was home to a number of colonial plantations in the 1700s, including "Sully," built by Richard Bland Lee I, George Richard Lee Turberville's "Leeton," and the John Hutchison Farm. Chantilly plantation was built on Leeton property prior to the Civil War. Cornelia Lee Turberville, who was born at Leeton and was the daughter of George Richard Lee Turberville & Henrietta Lee of Leeton, was given a portion of Leeton in 1817 when she married her cousin Charles Calvert Stuart. She named her plantation after her grandfather's plantation in Westmoreland County, VA - Richard Henry Lee - Signer of the Declaration of Independence. Chantilly plantation was burned down during the War by the Federal Troops in Feb 1863. The town retained the name of Chantilly.

Growth of the village predominantly occurred during the 19th century, particularly following the construction of Little River Turnpike (Route 236) to Winchester.

The evolution of the Chantilly area into an outer suburb of Washington, D.C., gained momentum after 1980, as developers built residential subdivisions and commercial areas, filling in the farm land south of Dulles Airport. Chantilly does not have a concentrated downtown district; the Fair Oaks / Fair Lakes retail cluster spread out along I-66 provides a loose focus for retail and public activities.

Civil War

During the American Civil War on September 1, 1862, the Battle of Chantilly (or Ox Hill) was fought nearby. Following his victory at the Second Battle of Bull Run (or Second Manassas), Confederate General Robert E. Lee directed Major General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson to cross Bull Run on August 31 and sweep around the position of Major General John Pope's Union Army of Virginia at Centreville. Reaching the Little River Turnpike northwest of Centreville, Jackson turned southeastward toward Fairfax Court House (now Fairfax, Virginia) to strike in rear of Pope's army.

During September 1, Pope, apprised of Jackson's movement, began to withdraw toward Fairfax Court House. Late in the day, Jackson clashed with Union forces under Brigadier General Isaac Stevens and Major General Philip Kearny near Ox Hill, west of Fairfax. During the ensuing battle, which was fought amid a raging storm, both Union generals Stevens and Kearny were killed. The fighting ended at dusk, and Pope's army continued its withdrawal to Fairfax and subsequently to the Washington defenses.

Although commercial and residential development now covers most of the Chantilly (Ox Hill) battlefield, a small county park preserves a five acre (19,000 m²) portion of the battle site.

Education

Primary and secondary schools

Residents of the CDP go to Fairfax County Public Schools.

Elementary schools within the CDP include Brookfield Elementary School, Greenbriar East Elementary School, Greenbriar West Elementary School, Lees Corner Elementary School, Navy Elementary School, and Poplar Tree Elementary School.

Rocky Run Middle School, Franklin Middle School, and Chantilly High School are located within the CDP. Westfield High School is a large high school located outside of the CDP.

St. Timothy School and St. Veronica School, private Catholic schools, are located in the CDP.

Chantilly Homes

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